1608, January 8. Thomas Savage at age thirteen came to Virginia arriving on 8 January 1608 with the First Supply under Captain Christopher
    Newport. Richard Savage arrives on the same ship. In John Smith's Narratives Of Early Virginia he lists names of those in the First Supply.
    Along with Thomas Salvage he lists Richard Salvage.                               
    1608, February.  John Smith, Christopher Newport, Thomas Savage, and others sail up the York River to meet with Powhatan. They
    exchange hostages. Thomas Savage remains behind to live with the Powhatans, while an Indian, Namontack, returns with the English to live
    at Jamestown. “With a trumpet before them, we marched to the King, who after his old manner kindly received them, especially a boy of
    thirteen years old, called Thomas Savage, whom he (Newport) gave him as his son.” “The next day we took leave of Powhatan, who, in regard
    of his kindness gave him (Newport) an Indian (Namontacke). He (was) well affected to go with him for England in steed of his Sonne (Thomas
    Savage), the cause, I assure me, was to know our strength and Couniries condition." And thus, less than two months after he had arrived in
    Virginia, young Savage was left, the only white person with the Indians.                                                                             A TRUE RELATION,
    by Captain John Smith in reference to Captain Christopher Newport giving Thomas Savage to Powhatan.
    1608, April 10. Powhatan’s “trusty servant”, Namontack, who was traded for Thomas Savage, sailed from Virginia with Captain Newport.

    1608, April 23.  Smith writes; “Powhatan had sent the boy he had to us, with many turkies.”
    The boy (Thomas Savage) he returned backe with his Chest and apparel, which then we had given him: desiring another for him. The cause
    was, he (Powhatan) was practicing with the Chikahamanias, as the boy suspected some villanie, by their extraordinary resort and secret
    conference, from whence they would send him. The boy we keep.

    1608, About April 27. This trap for our tooles, we expected the chiefe occasion was foure daies
    before Powhatan had sent the boy (Thomas Savage) he had to us, with many Turkies to Master Schrivener, and mee, understanding I would
    go up into his Countries to destroy them, and he doubted it the more, in that I so oft practiced my men, whose shooting he heard to his own
    lodging, that nuch feared his wives, and children; we sent him word, we intended no such thing, but only to go to Powhatan to seeke stones to
    make hatchets, except his men shoot at us, as Paspahegh had toold us they would, which if they did shoote but one arrowe, we would destroy
    them, and least this mischief might happen, sent the boy to acquint him this much, and request him to send us Weanock, one of his subjects for
    a guide. The boy (Thomas Savage) he returned backe with his chest and apparel, which then we had given him, desiring another for him, the
    cause was, he was practicing with the Chikahamanias, as the boy suspected some villanie, by their extraordinary resort, and secret
    conference from whence they would send him. The boy we keepe, now we would send him many messengers, and presents. The guide we
    desired he sent us, and withall requested us to returne him either the boy, or some other.
    John Smith’s A TRUE RELATION
    1608, May. "Powhatan, understanding we detained certaine Saluages, sent (in May 1608) his Daughter (Pocahuntas, his favorite), a child of
    tenne years old; which, not only for feature, countenance, and preportion, much exceedeth any of the rest of his people; but for wit and spirit,
    (is) the only Nonpriel of his Country. This hee sent by his most trustie messenger, called Rawhurt as much exceeding in defomiitiy of person;
    but of subatill wit and crafty understanding. "He, with a long circumstance, told mee how eli Powbatan loued amd respected mee; and that I
    should not doubt in any way his kindnesse, he had sent his child, which he most esteemed, to see me; a Deare and bread besides, for a
    present; desiring me that the Boy (Thomas Savage) might come again, which he loued exceedingly.""In the afternoone, we gaurded them as
    before to the Church; alter prayer, gaue them to Pocahontas, the King's Daughter, in regard of her fathers kindness in sending her." (Thomas
    Savage returned with Pocahontas and the freed Indians) RBS
    John Smith’s A TRUE RELATION

    1608, December 29. John Smith with a company of 43 men set out for Werawocomoco (Powhatan's town). The company consisted of 12 men in
    the barge, Discovery, 26 men in the Pinnace and five men who Smith sent overland; four Dutchmen and Richard Savage, to build a house for
    Powhatan. It appears that Richard Savage was either a Carpenter, or in charge of the Dutchmen and the building of the house for Powhatan,
    as he is identified by name. (Richard Savage arrived on the same ship, in Jan. 1607/08, as Ensign Thomas Savage)                          Capt. John
    Smith’s writings
    1608/1609, Winter. [Edward] Brynton and Richard Savage, seeing the Dutch-men so diligent to accommodate the Salvages with weapons,
    attempted to have gotten to James towne, but they were apprehended, and expected ever when to be put to death.
    Capt. John Smith’s THE GENERALL HISTORIE
       
    1609, March. Don Pedro de Zuniga, a spy for the King of Spain sends a coded letter to the King in which he, Zuniga, tells of Capt. Newport      
    giving Thomas Savage to Powhatan. Much information, damaging to the Colony is regularly conveyed by Zuniga to the King.

    1609, October – Henry Spelman account: "To James toune one Thomas Savage with 4 or 5 Indians cam from the great Powhatan with
    venison to Capt: Percye who was now president. Alter the delivery thereof and that he must returne he was loith to goe with out sum of his
    cuntrymen went with him, wher uppon I was apoynted to goe, which I the more wilinglie did, by Reason that vitals were scarse with us,
    cariinge with me sum copper and a hatchet which I had gotten. Cumminge to the great Powhatan, I presented to him such things as I had,
    which he tooke, usinge me very kindly, setline the Sauage and me at his owne Table messe."
    Written by Henry Spelman
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
     1610, April.  When Capt. John Martin visited the Eastern Shore in April 1610, he found Thomas Savage already a power among the red men (He
    would have been at the age of 15-16 at the time). It was Debedeavon, one of the Laughing Kings, who gave Savage his tract of land. Savage
    immediately became well established in the Indian councils. When John Pory went to the Eastern Shore in 1621, Savage was happy, enjoying
    the good will of the Laughing King and his brother Klotopeake. (Age 25-26 in 1621).
    1610: An attack upon the English at the Falls of the James River when Lord Delaware sent an expedition from Jamestown to search the
    country above the Falls for gold mines. In this attack Lord Delaware's nephew, Captain William West, was killed and Simon Skore, a sailor,
    and one Cobb, a boy, were taken prisoners. As a result of this fight the Indians said in their song that Thomas Savage, “had not frightened
    them with his sword (monacock)”.
    William Strachey. Travaile into Virginia, 79, 80.

    1612.  William Strachey writes about a song of the Indians which included Thomas Savage. Strachey relates; another scornefull song they
    made of us the last yeare at the Falls in manner of Tryumph at what time they killed Capt. William West our Lord Generalls nephew
    ---------------------------- He includes the full text of the song and follows with; Which may signifie how that they killed us for all our Poccasacks,
    that is our Guns, and for all Capt. Newport brought them Copper and could hurt Thomas Newport (a boy whose name is indeed Thomas
    Savadge, whome Capt Newport leaving with Powhatan to learn the language ----)
    (This text is from Strachey’s THE HISTORIE OF TRAVELL INTO VIRGINIA BRITANIA.
    I’m not completely sure he is writing of an event that took place in 1612. It could have been 1609 - 1611. RBS
    Captain John Smith – Writings with Other Narratives,  William Strachey, The Indians of Virginia, page 1067.  Selections and notes by James
    Horn. Publisher; Penguin Putnam Inc.

    1613. Thomas Savage served as an interpreter on Argall’s voyage. (See 1619 entry)
    1614, March. Interpreter Savage was a key figure in negotiating a truce to end the fighting with the still-potent Pamunkey tribe, and in May
    he helped restore a degree of intercultural harmony through his personal friendship with Powhatan.
    Middlemen in Peace and War: Virginia's Earliest Indian Interpreters, 1608-1632  Author(s): J. Frederick Fausz. The Virginia Magazine of
    History and Biography, Vol. 95, No. 1 (Jan., 1987), pp. 41-64.

    1614, May. After the marriage of John Rolfe and Pocahontas he (Thomas Savage) was now an interpreter accompanying Ralph Hamor to
    meet Powhatan on a mission for the governor, Thomas Dale, in which another daughter of Powhatan was being sought as a bride for Dale.
    This mission was, however, unsuccessful as Powhatan said that one daughter gave him enough assurance of English friendship. Of this
    venture Hamor relates: I had Thomas Slauage with me, for my interpreter; with him and two Saluages, for guides; I went from the Bermuda in
    the morning, and came to Matchot the next night, where the King (Powhatan) lay upon the River of Pamaunke; his entertainment was strange
    to me, the boy (Thomas Savage) he knew well and told him; My child, I gave you leave, being my boy, to goe see your friends, and these
    foure yeares I have not seene you, nor heard of my owne man Namontack.  
    (Hamor and Savage were lavishly entertained by Powhatan, spent the night, and upon leaving the next morning were given the remnants of
    breakfast, a whole roast turkey and three baskets of bread.) RBS
    A GENERALL HISTORIE by John Smith

    1617. Thomas Savage served as an interpreter for a merchant. (See 1619 entry)

    1619. Ensign Thomas Savage, with some indentured servants, began a profitable trading relationship with the Accawmack Indians. Savage’s
    success likely stemmed from his previous experience on the Eastern Shore serving as an interpreter, a skill he obtained while living with the
    Powhatans for several years, first on Argall’s 1613 voyage and later in 1617 for a merchant (Whitelaw 1951:22, Turman 1964:5, Hatch 1957:
    92). He received some land from Debedeavon, the Accawmack chief or werowance, however, there is some question of whether he
    established himself on a neck of land between the Chesapeake Bay and Cherrystone Creek which is called Savage’s Neck or on Old
    Plantation Creek as suggested by a later patent (Nugent I 1974:9). Virginia Company Foundation and The Association for the Preservation of
    Virginia Antiquities Nicholas M. Luccketti with contributions by Edward A. Chappell and Beverly A. Straube.  

    1620. When the first Virginia muster/census was taken, Interpreter Thomas Savage was on a trading voyage to Accomack and Acohanock.
    Va. Immigrants and Adventurers 1607-1635 a Bio. Dict. Martha W. McCartney

    1621, July. Virginia officials were informed that Thomas Savage had learned that the French were carrying on a great fur trade in
    Chesapeake Bay.
    Va. Immigrants and Adventurers 1607-1635 a Bio. Dict. Martha W. McCartney

    1621. Likewise when John Pory went to the Eastern Shore in 1621, Savage was happy, enjoying the good will of the Laughing King and his
    brother Klotopeake.
    Transcribed from the VIRGINIA PILOT AND THE NORFOLK LANDMARK. for Sunday March 8 1931 By R.K.T.Larson
                                                                                                                                   
    1621. John Pory writes; Not long after Namanicus the King of Pawtuxunt, came to us to seeke for Thomas Salvage our Interpreter. Thus
    insinuating himselfe, he led us into a thicket, where all sitting downe, he shewed us his naked breast; asking if we saw any deformitie upon it,
    we told him, No; No more, said hee, is the inside, but as sincere and pure; therefore come freely to my Countrie and welcome: which we
    promised we would within six weekes after. ------------------- The next day the two Kings with their people, came aboard us, but brought nothing
    according to promise; so that Ensigne Salvage challenged Namenacus the breech of three promises, viz. not in giving him a Boy, nor Corne
    though they had plentie, nor Moutapass (a futitive called Robert Marcum that had lived five yeeres amongst those northerly nations)
    --------------- The next day we went to Paccamaganant, and they directed us to Assacomoco, where their King Cassatowap had an old quarrell
    with Ensigne Salvage, but now seemed reconciled. --------------------------------- Leaving them as we found them, Very civill and subtill, wee
    returned the same way wee came to the Laughing Kings on the Eastern shore, who told us plainly, Namanicus would also have allured him
    (Thomas Savage) into his Country under colour of trade, to cut his throat. He told us also Opechancanough had employed Onianimo to kill
    Salvage; because he brought the trade from him to the Easterne Shore, and some disgrace hee had done his sonne and some thirteen of his
    people before one hundred of those Easterlings, in rescuing Thomas Graves whom they would have slaine: where hee and three more did
    challenge the thirteen Pamaunkies to fight, but they durst not; so that all those Easterlings so derided them, that they came there no more.
    This Thomas Salvage, it is sixteen yeeres since he went to Virginia, being a boy, hee was left with Powhatan for Namontacke, to learn the
    language: and as this Author (Pory) affirmeth, with much honestie and good successe hath served the publike without any publike
    recompence, yet had an arrow shot through his body in their service.
    John Smith’s A GENERALL HISTORIE; The observations of Master John Pory Secretarie of Virginia, in his travels.  
    [I’m not sure of the above 1621 date. Pory says “It’s 16 years since Savage arrived in Virginia.” Savage arrived in 1608, so that would make
    it 1624. I believe the 1621 date is more probable and Pory made a mistake with the “sixteen yeeres.”] RBS

    1621. John Pory, with Savage as intetpreter, and a handful of others, journed north into the Pawtuxunt region;. They encountered several old
    foes of Savage, but managed to make the best of the several situations, returning safely. ------------------------- Hee (Namanicus) told us also
    Opechancanough had employed Onianinto, to kill Salvage, because he brought the trade from him to the Eastern Shore.
    John Smith’s A GENERAL HISTORIE

    1621. Captain John Smith later said that as a result of an argument with an Indian leader on the Eastern shore Thomas Savage was wounded
    by an arrow shot into his back.
    Va. Immigrants and Adventurers 1607-1635 a Bio. Dict. Martha W. McCartney

    1621. Ann, or Hanna Savage, wife of Ensign Thomas Savage arrives in Virginia.
    Assuming marriage to the Ensign in that year, the Ensign would have been about 26 years of age. It could certainly be possible that this could
    have been a second marriage for the Ensign. It is also not without probability, since he had lived with and was so close to the Indians,
    particularly Powhatan, that the Ensign would have taken an Indian maiden as a wife well before the age of 26, perhaps a daughter of
    Powhatan; or Debedevon, which would be good reason for the “Laughing King” to give him a very large tract of land as a wedding gift. It
    could then be possible that Thomas the Carpenter was a son of this first union. This is, of course, pure conjecture.
    Another possibility: Has anyone ever considered that Ann Savage, who is listed in the 1624 muster with Ensign Thomas Savage may have
    been an earlier wife - and Hannah, who appears in 1633 as the Ensign’s widow, may have been a different person? RBS

    1621, October. About the time that Opechancanough was deceiving the gullible colonists with pledges of peace and promises to convert to
    Christianity, Savage discovered the terrifying truth of the Werowance’s implacable hatred of the English. His friendship with the "Laughing
    King" of Accomac and his brother, Kiptopeke, Werowance of the Accohannocs, provided Savage with vital information known only to Indians.
    These Eastern Shore leaders, who had consistently supported the English since the Anglo-Powhatan War, told Savage that Opechancanough
    had recently tried to obtain a poison found only on their side of the bay to use against the colonists. They also revealed that the Pamunkeys
    were planning to assemble all of their allies at a huge ceremony for "the takinge upp of Powhatans bones" and to dispatch those warriors
    against "every Plantatione in the Colonie." After the two Indians informed Savage that he and they were specifically marked for death
    because of their close ties, Savage visited the Patuxents (of "Maryland"), the Pamunkeys' newest and northernmost allies, and verified, by
    the hostility he encountered, the truthfulness of the "Laughing King'"s story. Despite Savage's best efforts to convince his countrymen of
    imminent danger, the new governor at Jamestown, Sir Francis Wyatt, continued to take Opechancanough at his word and believed in the
    "very great amytie and confidence w[i]th the natiives." But the accuracy of Savage's predictions became horrifyingly apparent on Friday, 22
    March 1622, when Opechancanough's forces fell upon English settlements throughout the length and breadth of the James River.
    Middlemen in Peace and War: Virginia's Earliest Indian Interpreters, 1608-1632  J. Frederick Fausz
    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 95, No. 1 (Jan., 1987), pp. 41-64

    1622, March. At the time of the March 1622 massacre, the Eastern Shore Indians remained friendly to the colonists, with much credit for this
    thought to be due to Savage. Jamestowne Society - Washington & Northern Virginia Company -- Biographies of Ancestors of Members

    1622, Dec. 15.  [ffor the Certentye of Corne it is best knowne to my selfe for yt by sendinge & discoueringe those places, ffirst I haue not
    onely reaped the benefitt, but all the whole Collonye since; whoe had perished had it not bene discouered before Sr George Yardley came in
    by my
    Aunchient Thomas Savage & servants, besides necessities hath made those Savages more industrious then any other Indians in or Baye, wch
    followeth to appeare in this seacond pfitt.]
    The Library of Congress, Jefferson Papers - Colonial Settlement, 1600’s – 1763
    A Proposal for Subjugating the Indians, December 15, 1622, by John Martin

    1623, March 7. Court. Solomon Green aged about 26 sworne & examined saith that Capt whittakers did let one of the Companys tenent
    named John Vaughan into Ensegne Savadge for a yeare & the fellow was to have 100# tob: & e barrels of corn for his half p’tes & Enseigne
    Savadge was to go a trading viaidge wch Capt whittaker on a shallop when she should demand him for his p’te of the mans service, and
    whereas Capt whittaker alledgeth that Ensigne Savadge went to him for cloths due him fro Capt. Whittakers
    Capt Ralph Hamor sayth that hethe 8 baskett of Corne cont’eu’ry basket 21 Cans at Machponyo wch seems to be p’te of the Ccorn that
    Savadge bought of himfor truck formerly to him by me & thir I R thirty thousand or therabout of blew beads but did not vnderstand wherefore
    they were left in myshallop wch my beads at an other towne vppon the EasternShore I bought 25 basketts or thereabouts of Corne cont. each
    basket butter firkin
    Capt Tucker sworne and exd saith that of the Laughing King sent in the quantity of twelve baskets of Corne or thereabouts and saw it was for
    the great King as Ensegne Savadgesaith so far as I remember ensegne Savadge told him the Mr. Pountis saith that last Sumer that the
    laughing kinge had sent the Gouernor 20 tubbs of corne the same did the laughing kinge affirmes at his now beinge there Ensegn Savadge
    being his Interpretor
    Note: This is another obscure record. Thomas Savage /for whom see this Magazine, I, 433, &c.,) seems to have been on a trading voyage to
    the Eastern Shore, in partnership with Captain Jabez Whitaker, during which he obtained from the Laughing King, the principal chief of that
    section, certain corn which the officials at Jamestown claimed was intended, by the chief, as a gift to the Governor.
    Minutes of Virginia Council and General Court, 1622-1624 – March 7, 1623

    1622 – 1632. During the second Anglo-Powhatan War (1622-32) the English depended upon the services of Savage to assure the assistance of
    the Accomacs and to procure much-needed maize and lands for secure settlement from Kiptopeke and his brother.
    Middlemen in Peace and War: Virginia's Earliest Indian Interpreters, 1608-1632  J. Frederick Fausz
    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 95, No. 1 (Jan., 1987), pp. 41-64

    1623, Sept. 4. John Penreis. Petition to Governor and Council in Virginia. September 4, 8, 1623.Now for yet your petioner hath had spetiall
    order from his principals of Southampton hundred to employ ther shipping as well in trade in the Bay as elswher for ther and the publique
    good, for which affairs your petitioner hath hired Ensigne Thomas Savage to bee ther Interpreter.
    Manuscript Records Virginia Company, III, pt. ii, p. 59a. Lib. Of Congress

    1624/25, Feb. 4. Sir George Yeardly, Knight, defendant, answers to the complaint of Capt. John Martin. Yeardly employed Savage as
    interpreter, not being acquainted that Savage was under hire by Martin. Refers to Savage’s shallop, his crop and his men.
    To the fifth [complaint] the said Defendant [Yeardley] that soon after his
    arrival to be Governor having occasion for the publique service to employ Ensigne Savage as an Interpreter he sent for him to the
    Complaynant [Martin] at whose Plantacon he then lived and saith that after the said Ensignes returne the like occacon required the sendinge
    of him againe butt saith that I was nott acquainted by the said Complaynnt that the said Ensign was his hired servant [the term, servant meant
    the same as today’s, employee, or in this case, perhaps as a private contractor] neither did the said Complaynant require the said Ensigne to
    be sent home againe. Nor did the said defendant know that the Complaynant had any occasion to employ the said Ensign to go abroad in his
    Shallopp. And saith further that he did not understand that the said Ensign was servant to the said complaynant or any man else but a
    publique Interpreter. Yet saith that if the said complainant had desired to make use of the Ensigne -----------------------//---------------- whilest the
    said Ensigne was employed by the said Defendant for the publique service of the Collony any intent to send forth his Shallop on trading for
    that his Cropp must have spoiled on the ground in the absente of his people.
    C.O. 1, Vol. III, No. 36, I. Public Record Office, London.

    1624, March 7. "Ordered that Ensign Thomas Savage shall interpret for the good of the Plantation of Accomack according to such directions
    as he shall receive from Captain William Epes or else to bond of 200 pounds sterling not to have any conference or familiaritie with Indians of
    those parts."
    Jamestowne Society - Washington & Northern Virginia Company -- Biographies of Ancestors of Members

    1624,  June 22. Court at James City. Deposition by Harmer who claims he overheard Capt. William Epps say that Ensign Savage had
    slandered him.
    (The disposition of the case is unclear as this document is extremely difficult to decipher. RBS)
    The Library of Congress. The Thomas Jefferson Papers Series 8. Virginia Records Manuscripts. 1606-1737.
    Virginia General Court, 1622-29, Cases, with Minutes. Image 86 of 1322.

    1624-27. Because Savage possessed the unrivaled ability to obtain grants of land and large quantities of maize from his Indian contacts,
    entrepreneurs such as former Governor Yeardley and Captain John Martin of Martin's Brandon vied for his services, both in and out of the
    courts.  In 1624 Yeardley succeeded in making the third of the three interpreters do his bidding by having Savage convicted of slander and
    insubordination against Captain William Eppes, commander of the Eastern Shore plantations and Yeardley's close associate. Sitting on the
    council that sentenced Savage to serve Eppes and himself, Yeardley engineered the dubious conviction. Savage obtained his freedom in 1627,
    when Yeardley died and Eppes emigrated to the West Indies, and his rare and valued talents quickly earned him rich rewards in the booming
    Chesapeake fur trade. Compensated in cattle, cash, and corn for a variety of services requiring expertise in Indian relations, Savage dealt
    with most of the rising fur entrepreneurs on the Eastern Shore including Charles Harmar, sole witness against Savage in 1624.
    Middlemen in Peace and War: Virginia's Earliest Indian Interpreters, 1608-1632  J. Frederick Fausz
    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 95, No. 1 (Jan., 1987), pp. 41-64

    1624. John Pory wrote: Leaving them as we found them. Very civill and subtill, wee returned the same way wee came to the Laughing Kings
    on the Eastern shore, who told us plainly, Namanicus would also have allured him (Thomas Savage) into his Country under colour of trade, to
    cut his throat. He told us also Opechancanough had employed Onianimo to kill Salvage; because he brought the trade from him to the
    Easterne Shore, and some disgrace hee had done his sonne and some thirteen of his people before one hundred of those Easterlings, in
    rescuing Thomas Graves whom they would have slaine: where hee and three more did challenge the thirteen Pamaunkies to fight, but they
    durst not; so that all those Easterlings so derided them, that they came there no more.This Thomas Salvage, it is sixteen yeeres since he went
    to Virginia, being a boy, hee was left with Powhatan for Namontacke, to learn the language: and as this Author (Pory) affirmeth, with much
    honestie and good successe hath served the publike without any publike recompence, yet had an arrow shot through his body in their service.
    Narratives of Early Virginia – writings of John Pory.[I’m not sure of the above 1624 date. I use it because Pory says it’s 16 years
    since Savage arrived in Virginia (1608). It may have been written around 1619/20 and Pory made a mistake with the sixteen yeeres.] RBS

    1624. The muster of 1624.
    Ancient Thomas Savage, in the John and Francis 1607
    Ann Savage, in the Sea Flower 1621
    Servants:
    John Washborne age 30 in the Jonathan 1620
    Thomas Belson age 12.
           
    1624.  Captain Samuel Mathew of Denby, Virginia held a note for tobacco due
    from several individuals, including Thomas Salvage.
    English Adventurers and Emigrants, 1609-1660.  Abstracts of Examinations in the
    High Court of Admiralty with Reference to Colonial America - page 89.

    1624, Dec. 27.  A Courtt held the 27th of December 1624 present Sr Francis Wyatt knighte & Capt Fran[cis] West Sr George Yardley knight
    George Sandys Esqr Thretsr Doctor Pott, Capt' Smith, Capt Hamer.
    1. The First and the fyft Articles demand of Capt Martin Conceminge Sr George Yardley, is refered vntill the Cominge vpp of Ensigne Savage

    1625, May. Extracts of all the Titles and Estates of Land, sent home by Sir Francis Wyatt. [Wyatt names roughly 95 land grant holders in this
    list. Of those, four grants are termed, Dividents; (including Ensign Savage), six are termed, By Order of Court and the balance, by Pattent.
    On the Eastern Shore only Blower, Savage and Yeardly are listed.] RBS
           The Easterne Shore
    John Blowers                 140 Acres
    Ensigne Salvage          Divident
    Sir George Yeardly         3700 Acres, by order of Courte
    Manuscript Records Virginia Company, III, pt. ii, pp. 71a-75. Library of Congress

    1627, 12 December. Land grant.Savadge, Hannah wife of Thomas Savage Gent. 50 acres on the Eastern Shoare with.in the pe.cincts of the
    plantacon of Accomack being a small neck of Land, abutting Northward on the Maine River - etc.
    Library of Virginia - Colonial Land Patents

    1631. On the first trip up to Kent Island after arrival in the Africa at Point Comfort in Virginia in 1631, Capt. Claiborne's interpreter was
    Ensign Thomas Savage, a resident of  the Eastern Shore. As early accounts report, Savage had arrived in Virginia as a boy in 1608 aboard
    the first supply ship to Jamestowne and had spent time in the village of Chief Powhatan.                               

    1631, August 12. Stated to be the date of the last record of The Ensign. He is presumed deceased by 9-24-1633 when Hannah is referred to
    as, widow.
    1633, Sept 24.  Reference to Hannah Savage, widow. Acknowledges obligation of 500 pounds of lawful money to King Charles to be levied
    upon her goods and chattles.

    1634, March 10. Northampton/Accomack Court. Several references to Ensign Thomas Savage. One references 13 yards of linen, bushels and
    pecks, wages, and a wildcat skin. (The Ensign is presumed to be now deceased based on the 9-24-1633 reference to Hannah as; widow).
    Northampton/Accomack Orders, Deeds, Wills  Bk 1   1632 - 1640

    1634, May 16. These bills Mr. Melling took out by order of this court out of Captain Scarboroughs bag of writings: Item. 1 bill of Ensign
    Thomas Savage 090 pounds.

    1634, May 19. In an action regarding; “Cugley rested debytor” it is noted; “more for 36s. and 5d. of Ensigne Savage  01.16.05

    1635, Feb. 19. In Nora Turman's book, "The Eastern Shore of Virginia 1603-1964" it states that Ensign Thomas Savage died before
    2/19/1635.  

    1635, June 16. A defamation case involving Hanna Savage.

    1635, August 24. Hannah Savage Patent; a parcel and quantity of ground in the name of John Savage.
    To all to whom these presents shall come I Capt. John West Esq. Governor and
    Capt. General of Virginia send greeting in a Lord God everlasting whereas by letters  bearing date of four and twentieth day of July 1634
    from the Right Honorable Lords of  His Majesties most honorable Privie Counsuil their Lordships did authorize  the Governor  and  Counsuil
    of Virginia to dispose of such portions of land to all planters being freemen as they had power to do before the year 1625, When according to
    divers orders and constitutions in that [case          and] appointed all dividents of lands anywise due or belonging to any Adventurer or planter
    of what condtion or quality soever to be laid out and assigned unto those according to the [           ]   in the [             ].       Now Know yee that I
    the [       ] Capt John West Esq [       ] with the [consent] of the Counsell of [            ] give and grant unto Hannah Savage, the relic of Ensigne
    Thomas Savage late of Accomack planter a parcel and quantity of ground lying in Accomack aforesaid and being bounded with the Creeke of
    Accomack on the South the great bay on the west Wissaponso on the North and the main ocean on the East which said parcel of land was
    granted unto her husband Ensigne Thomas Savage by the King of The Eastern Shore as by deed calling himself Esmy Shichans  in his hand
    writing himself ---------------------------- etc. ----------------------------- etc.   
    Under my hand and seal with the seal of the Colony this 24th day of August, 1635 and in this [      ] year of his majesty and Soverigne Lord
    King Charles  [    ] England.
                                                 
                                              This patent is received by Sir John Harvey Governor in the name of John Savage            Rich [_____]
                        
    1635. Record of another Thomas Savage arriving somewhere in the Virginia Colony. Where he located is unknown.

    1637, Nov. 21, ……. grant unto John Savage, son and heir to Ensign Thomas Savage late of Accomack deceased a great quantity of land
    lying in Accomack [……….the Creek of Accomack] on the South the great bay on the west Wissoponson on the north and the maine ocean on
    the east the said quantity of land being due unto him the said John Savage in right of descent from the father Thomas Savage and granted by
    the King of the Eastern Shore

    1639, 29-Nov. The deposition of Mr. wilkins. This deponent sayth that he beinge in the compayne of Ensign Savage at such time as ther was a
    generall drifte for the wild catle both by Indians and English heard Ensign Savage declare himselfe as followinge that he should have a beast
    for his paynes that he did procure the Indians for that purpose --- not Capt. scarbrough had procured the Indians and he wanted such like
    satisfaction this is all this deponent can say.
    ========================================================================================================
    ===

    This ends the time-line for Ensign Thomas Savage and begins the time-line for Thomas Savage, the Carpenter. It is important to note that
    there is no overlap, of the lives of these two men, noted in the record.

    ========================================================================================================
    ===

    1632, March 14. Thomas Savage, Carpenter, 100 acres on Old Plantation Creek, at Accomacke.  “To all whom these presents shall come I
    Sir John Harvey Knight Governor and Capt. General of Virginia send greeting [    ] Lord God Everlasting Whereas by an order of Court
    made the Eleventh day of February last past It was ordered that all such planters and other persons whatsoever as have no land due unto
    them by any adventure or otherwise should have a certain quantity of land granted unto them. (This phrase may suggest that Thomas Savage
    the Carpenter was born in Virginia). Now know ye that in consideration thereof I the said Sir John Harvey do by those presents with the
    consent of the Counsel of State grant demise and farm let unto Thomas Savage, Carpenter one hundred acres of land situate lying and being
    upon the Creek commonly known by the name of Old Plantation Creek.”

    1637. Thomas Savage is released from the 21 year lease per his application to the court.

    1637. Thomas Savage witness to the sale of cattle.

    1637. Thomas Savage to pay John Neale 260 pounds of tobacco.

    1637, March 26. Thomas Savage is a witness for a Phillip Dodesworth.

    1638. William Berryman to pay Thomas Savage 340 pounds of tobacco.

    1638. Thomas Savage to pay Mr. Chandler 744 pounds of tobacco.

    1638/39. Thomas Saverige witness to will of Thomas Lee.

    1639, February. It is thought Fitt and Accordingly Ordered By this Courte [that the] Land of Thomas Savage sonne and heire unto Ensigne
    Thomas Savage Deceased shall Be surveyed within the space of a Moneth after the date hereof. And that the survey thereof shall bee payde
    for By the Overseers; And Further if in case noe payment shall bee by them made For the survey thereof, That then there shall soe much
    raysed out of the said Land as shall Fully satisfye and pay For the same."

    1640, September. "A very greate Quantity of land is graunted unto Thomas Savage sonne and heire unto Ensigne Thomas Savage [bounded]
    as followeth viz. with the Creeke of Accomack on the [South the] greate Bay on the West Wisoaponso [?] on the North and the [maine ocean]
    on the East dated the one and twentieth day of December I terrio Caroli Rex."

    1640. Thomas Newte assigns corn, tobacco and hoggs to Thomas Savage as security till 300 pounds of tobacco is paid.

    1641, May. John Webster appointed as guardian of John Savage. (Capt. John) Whereas the Widdow and Relict of Daniell Cugley deceased
    did desire upon her death bed that John Webster should be Guardian in the behalfe of her sonne the heyer and Orphant of Ensigne Savage
    her former husband, As allso being she desire of the sayd Orphant. It is therefore Ordered that the said Webster shalbe Guardian of the
    Orphant of the sayd Savage and shall by virtue heerof have power, to lett, sett, and make use of all the Landes belonging unto the sayd
    Orphant, togither with all such goodes and Chattells and doe belong unto him, As alsoe to call in question all such person, and persons as are
    seated upon the sayd Land without Order, and hee the sayd Webster to imploy the sayd Landes and other goodes to the best benefit, and
    advantage, of the sayd Orphant and noeotherwise.

    1642/43. January. Ames page 227. Deposition of Henry Garland. Stephen Charleton advises John Knight about Mr. Yardley; “Therefore I
    wish you to have a care lest that hee (Yardley) serve you as hee serv’d Thomas Savage For hee work’d there Two yeares and hath nothing
    For his paynes but hath been Cozened of all neither can he get away.” Page 228 more of the same but referencing “Tom” Savage. Evidently
    Thomas Savage built a house for Yeardley.

    1642, March. Thomas Savage promised Ambrose Dixon that he would pay to Richard Hudson two barrels of corn which Dixon owed Hudson.

    1642, April. Ames page 160. Thomas Savage and Christopher Kirke bargain for land. (This is evidently the 400 acres he sells in November
    following.)

    1642, August. Ames page 195. Thomas Savage deposition where he states that last March he promised Ambrose Dixon that he would pay to
    Richard Hudson two barrels of corn which Dixon owed Hudson. Dixon promised to pay Savage thirty shillings sterling “in Goods as they cost
    the first penny when Capt. Stone his Pinnace came from New England.”

    1642, August. Ames page 200. Ambrose Dixon and Richard Hudson case settled per deposition of Thomas Savage.

    1642, August. Savage page 11. Cirtificate granted to Thomas Savage, Carpenter for ten headrights.

    1642, November 11. Thomas Savage sells 400 acres to Christopher Kirke.

    1642/43, March. Ames page 259. Thomas Savage Carpenter sells a shallopp to Richard Newport. Part of payment was one man servant with
    necessary carpenter’s tools.

    1643, July. Ames page 286. Thomas Savage deposition re. This deponent saith that Edmund Carter being indebted to Thomas Parker three
    hundred and Fifty pounds of tobacco the sayde Edmund Carter did pay one hogshead of tobacco parte of the sayde debt
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Parker demanded the residue and John Johnson bidd fetch a pair of stilliards (weigh
    scales) and he would pay him presently. Signed by the marke of Thomas Savage

    1643, August. Ames page 300. Thomas Savage’s “man”  and “the Dutch Carpenter” bargain for linen. Thomas’s man offers four pounds the
    Ell while the Dutchman asks six pounds. Thomas’s man sends for his “Master” (Thomas Savage) to get approval to pay the Dutchman’s
    price.

    1644, May. Ames page 361. Thomas Savage shall at the next Cropp satisfy and pay unto James Johnson one shute of Cloathes one pair of
    shoes and Fower hundred pounds of tobacco and caske ----------------for wages due From Robert Wyard.

    1644, Sept. Ames page 390. Thomas Savage is witness for Peter Walker, Gentleman and William Fisher, Planter.

    1644, January. Ames page 400. John Webster Guardian of John Savage Orphant of Ensigne John Savage That the said Webster doth owe
    and stand indebted unto Capt. William Clayborne Treasurer for Quit Rent for 4000 acres of land belonging unto the said Savage.

    1645, Feb 28. Thomas Savage tobacco reference.

    1645, July. Ames page 446. Ordered that John Hinman shall pay Thomas Savage fower barrels of Indian Corne And Two hundred sixty and
    Five pounds of tobacco

    1646, Land Pat. Bk. No. 2, page 119. “patent granted to Thomas Savage for 500 acres ---------------------------------- (see 1642 certificate for ten
    persons) (See Savage page 11)

    1646, Feb. 10. Edw Ginkins will - Item due from Thomas Savage one cotton wast Coate.

    1646, June 29th 1646, Deposition of Henry Garland. Captain Francis Yardley owes to Thomas Savage Carpenter, one man servant of the
    trade of Coop (cooper) or carpenter (with clothing, listed) for a term of four years.

    1646, June 29. Deposition of Francis Pettett. “----------- about february last past in meeting of Thomas Savage and John Savage, Thomas
    Savage asked the said John Savage saying how is it Cozen.”

    1646. Thomas Savage2 is born.

    1647, Feb. 8. Thomas Savage is a witness to a contract of Argoll Yardley. Signs with his mark.

    1647, Dec. 28. John Savage assigns 2900 acres to Argoll Yardley, referring to it as inheritance “from my deceased father Thomas Savidge.”

    1648, July 27. Argoll Yardley conveys the above 2900 acres to John Stringer - the parcel “being part of a grand divident of 9000 acres made
    unto the said John Savage dated Nov. 21, 1637.

    1648, Nov. 6. Whittington vs Thomas Savage concerning a title of land. Savage shall make payment for “building and clearing” and shall
    “enjoy the land ------------- according to his pattent.”  

    1649, July. Thomas Savage acknowledges that he is indebted to Argoll Yardley for 10 days work.

    1649, July. Petition of Thomas Savage that Capt. Francis Yardley be unsuited and arrested at his suite and pay costs of the suit.

    1649, Oct. Thomas Savage to pay Randall Revell 1800 pounds tobacco (due by specialty). This is probably wages owed by Savage, for in the
    following entry Revell was “at work at John Dolbeyes Howse.” Revell was probably a carpenter.

    1649, Oct. 4. Thomas Savage witnesses a John Stringer contract for the sale of a horse - signs with his mark.

    1649, Nov. 28. Deposition of Robert Steward. John Savage sold 1000 acres to Thomas Dimmer between the head of Savage His Creek and
    ajoining his sister Margarettes land. -------- At least 850 acres there should be. (John Savage, son of Ensign Thomas Savage)

    1649. Nov. 29. Deposition of Robert Steward. That John Rose (a Dutchman) was to serve Thomas Savage for 12 months - payment 1200 lbs.
    tobacco, 6 barrels corn, one shirt, one pair shoes and stockings, taxes and duties, housing for his wife and children. Recorded Dec. 1649.

    1650. Patent issued to Henry [Peasley] - transported a Thomas Savage prior to 1650.

    1650, Jan. Deposition of Mr. Stephen Charlton who refers to being at the house of Thomas Savage last Saturday. In reference to Stringer,
    Waddelowe and Badham case.

    1650, Oct. Thomas Savage vs Jeffery Minshall. Minshall ordered to provide for the bastard child he hath begotten of the body of Ann Baily a
    servant of Thomas Savage.

    1651, October. John Stringer claims Thomas Savage killed one of his steers.

    1652, Feb. 25. Cornelius Johnson, late servant unto Thomas Savage.

    1652, July. Savage page 12. Thomas Savage granted certificate for 250 acres in Northampton County.

    1653, July. Thomas Savage sells a sow to William Jordon for six barrels of Indian corn.

    1653, Aug. 16. Thomas Savage identifies himself as “Cooper”.

    1654, November. John Stringer vs Thomas Savage steer case is resolved.

    1654, June 20. Francis Yardley authorizes Thomas Savage “to fall any manner of timber upon my divident of land lying on the north side of
    Nutwattix Creek.”

    1656, March. Frakoff Hbben claims the estate of Thomas Savage owes him corn.

    1656, March. John Smyth marries Rebecca the widow and relict of Thomas Savage

    1660, Dec. 18. Thomas Savage’s son, John, marries Dorothy Jordan. Second son, Thomas would now be only 14, indicating that John was the
    eldest. However, Thomas inherited the 500 acre plantation and John received other land.

    1661. Sept. 1. Thomas Savage’s daughter, Dorothy marries John Sturgis.

    1664. Capt. John Savage is reissued a patent for 9000 acres according to a 1673 patent; (appears by patent dated the 21st of November 1637
    and on the 28th of [        ] 1664 [           ] (againe) unto the Capt John Savage by said William Berkeley)

    1673, Nov. 8th. 1673, Capt. John Savage 9000 Acre Patent: To all [    ] Whereas [            ] know yee that [          ] (Sir) William Berkeley [         
    ] do give and grant unto Capt. John Savage nine thousand acres of land situate in Northampton County
    bounded on the west by the Bay of Chesapiack, on the east by the main ocean, on the south by Cherryston Creek, formerly called Accomack
    Creek, the main branch thereof [   ] a
    right line running from [      ] main branch of Cherryston Creek into the main ocean
    on the north by Savage Creek formerly called Wisioponson and a (right) line running
    from the head branch of Savage Creek into the main ocean, the said land being formerly granted to Hannah Savage by Capt. John West
    Governor and Capt. General of England
    as may it appear by pattent  dated the 24th of Aug 1635 and since received by said John Harvey Knight Governor as it may appears by
    patent dated the 21st of November 1637 and on the 28th of [        ] 1664 [           ] (againe) unto the Capt John Savage by said William
    Berkeley Knight Governor and is [    ] to the (said) Capt. John Savage by and for the transportation of one hundred twenty two persons into
    this Collony whose names are on the records mentioned and (or) the aforesaid patent granted the 28th of November 1664 and for the
    transportation of fifty eight persons into this Collony whose names are on the records mentioned under a patent granted to Coll. John Stringer
    the 13th  of March 1661 and by the said Coll. Stringer & Anne his wife assigned to the said Capt. John Savage the 11th of Aug. 1663 [    ] by
    them in open court acknowledged the 28th of April 1664 to have and to hold [ to ]  be [ held] (yeilding) [  ] (paying) [  ]: dated the 8th day of
    November 1673.

    1684, July 16. The attestation of Ann Paramore taken this 16th day of July, 1684.        
    That Thomas Savage did in his lifetime in the hearing of the subscriber declare after he came from Squire Yardleys that he [page 73] had then
    cleared his negro that he thought the negro girl’s name was Petronello and he told his wife he did freely give the said negro girl unto his eldest
    daughter Dorothy Savage and the first child of the said negro unto his second daughter Rebecca Savage to the which I am ready to dispose
    when there unto required.
    Ann Paramore  The 16th day of July, 1684 Sworn in open court at the instance of Richard Robinson.
    Northampton County Orders and Wills 1683 - 1686


    SOURCES:

    Accomack/Northampton County Court Records, Eastville. Virginia,
    A TRUE RELATION, by Captain John Smith
    Northampton/Accomack Co. Orders, Deeds, Wills, Book 1, 1632-1640
    Northampton County Record Book, Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc. Vol. 3, 1645-1651.
                “        “        “        “        “        “        Book IV, 1651-1654.
    Virginia Company Foundation and The Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities Nicholas M. Luccketti with contributions by
    Edward A. Chappell and Beverly A. Straube.  
    The Thomas Jefferson Papers - The Library of Congress.
    VIRGINIA PILOT AND THE NORFOLK LANDMARK. for Sunday March 8 1931 By R.K.T.Larson
    Va. Immigrants and Adventurers 1607-1635 a Bio. Dict. Martha W. McCartney
    Jamestowne Society - Washington & Northern Virginia Company -- Biographies of Ancestors of Members
    The Library of Congress, Jefferson Papers - Colonial Settlement, 1600’s – 1763 A Proposal for Subjugating the Indians, December 15, 1622,
    by John Martin
    A Eubank Genealogy in Seventeenth Century Virginia. A Collection of References from primarily the Eastern Shore, Northern Neck,
    Counties of York and New Kent
    Accomack/Northampton Co. Ct. Records 1632-1640. Susie M. Ames
    Accomack/Northampton Co. Ct. Rec. 1640-1645. Susie M. Ames
    Northampton County Orders, Deeds, Wills 1651-1654    Book IV    Walczyk
    The Eastern Shore of Virginia 1603-1964   Nora Turman
    Savage Is My Name, R. Blair Savage, 1995.
    Loose Papers and Sundry Court Cases 1628-1731, Northampton County, VA, Vol 1, by Jean M. Mihalyka.
TIME-LINE

This is a time-line of found records of events in the lives of

“Ensign” Thomas Savage
and
Thomas Savage the “Carpenter”
of the
Eastern Shore of Virginia

All entries through 1631 cover the life of Ensign Thomas Savage and beginning in 1632 all entries cover the life of Thomas Savage the Carpenter. It
was only after laying out this time-line that I discovered that the record shows no overlapping of the lives of two gentlemen who were, as stated by
various Virginia history sources, to be contemporaries. My believe is that the Carpenter became of age by 1632 and first appears in the record, while
the Ensign died between 1631 and 1633 and  no longer appeared in the colonial records. RBS        
 
          
Last update - 6-21-17